10 Benefits of Physical Therapy

Most of us have heard the term “physical therapy” at some point in our lives – whether hearing about a friend or having to see a physical therapist ourselves.

But few of us actually know the full extent to what the benefits of physical therapy can be.  

Most often people will associate physical therapy with a post-surgery requirement or something you do if you have a sports injury.  But, it can be helpful in many additional circumstances.  

In general, the goal of physical therapy is to help restore physical function or reduce pain, often making it easier to daily tasks or activities.  Improving the way we move and / or how we feel can be beneficial for a broad array of people and health issues.  And can even benefit those individual looking to improve fitness levels or overall wellness.

From reducing pain to improving women’s health – here are 10 benefits of physical therapy:

1. Pain Management:

Physical therapy is a great way to reduce or even eliminate pain.  Its one of the most common reasons people go to physical therapy.  Through therapeutic exercises and other forms of manual therapy, physical therapy can help manage pain, and rehabilitate muscle and joint functions to prevent pain re-occurrence.

Physical therapy has been shown to be as beneficial, if not more, than prescription medication for helping to reduce pain in many instances.  It is a great way to avoid or lessen opiod dependency for pain management.

2. Recovery and Prevention for Sports Injuries:

 

From the little league level, all the way to professional athletics, non-surgical sports injuries are a common occurrence. Physical therapy is one of the best and safest treatments for athletic-related injuries.

Many physical therapy practices even specialize in sports injuries and can help athletes combat the mental and emotional affects of their injury. Missing a season and sitting on the sidelines can be a large psychological burden for injured athletes.

3. Prevent and/or Recover from Surgery:

Early physical therapy interventions have been shown to help prevent current health conditions from worsening to the point where surgery is needed.  And, for certain conditions (like meniscal tears and rotator cuff tears), physical therapy has even been effectively used as a replacement for surgery.

If surgery is needed, physical therapy, both before (for conditions like ACL tears or joint replacements) and after surgery, is an effective method for ensuring optimal recovery outcomes.

 

4. Stroke Recovery:

It is common for victims of a stroke to experience an impairment in ease of movement. Physical therapy can assist stroke victims recover and regain their weakened functioning, as well as their gait and balance. Overall, this improved functioning translates to increased independence for the stroke victim and a lesser burden on the caregiver.

5. Improved and Maximized Movement:

Physical therapy, through methodical exercise plans and progressive stretching routines, strengthen your muscles and joints, improving your flexibility and mobility! This means that you can do everyday movements and activities, such as bending, walking, and stretching, with more ease and comfort.

6. Assist with Diabetes management:

Physical therapy involves intentional movement and stretches. In its most basic sense, physical therapy is therapeutic exercise. And exercise is highly effective at controlling blood sugar, making it a useful tool for managing diabetes and vascular conditions.

7. Improved Balance and Coordination:

While we all have our clumsy moments, there is a population out there who truly needs help with coordination and stability problems.  Physical therapy can help. By safely challenging balance, physical therapy helps to improve coordination and overall balance, preventing falls and stumbles.

8. Manage Gender Specific Health Issues:

From breast cancer and constipation, to fibromyalgia and pelvic pain, physical therapy can help with many gender specific conditions, improving patients ability to manage them in their everyday lives.

9. Assist with Heart And Lung Disease Management:

Sometimes we forget that we can consciously exercise our heart and lungs (afterall, our heart is a muscle!). This means that physical therapy can target heart and lung related diseases through conditioning and breathing exercises, even helping patients clear fluid in the lungs! Overall, physical therapy can improve the quality of life for many suffering from these diseases.

10. Manage Aging Issues:

From joint replacements to arthritic and osteoporotic conditions, aging presents many challenges to the body’s bones and muscles. Physical therapy can help people avoid, manage, and maybe even recover from these ailments.

Clearly, physical therapy has many benefits and can help with many health problems!

We hope that you now better understand the purposes and benefits of physical therapy. 

Maybe all these benefits have influenced you to consider incorporating physical therapy into your wellness journey, we know it certainly inspired us!

Visit http://www.tiyagahealth.com to see how we are helping you stay motivated with your daily exercises! 

 

Add Yoga to Your Routine for Injury Recovery & Prevention: Local Nashville Yoga Studios to Try

We recently posted about the 10 benefits of starting a daily stretching routine – Consistent stretching has a ton of benefits from helping you feel better physically, increasing mobility, reducing pain, and preventing injuries.

“A daily regimen will deliver the greatest gains” –  Harvard Health

One way to start adding more stretching into your day is by checking out a local Yoga studio.  Yoga is a great way to stretch your limbs and increase your flexibility, in addition to the many benefits it has for those dealing with injury recovery.

 

Research says that “Stress  been shown to be one of the factors leading to musculo-skeletal disorders (MSDs) such as: include back pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, shoulder or neck tension, eye strain, or headaches and 

Yoga…can reduce stress and relieve muscular tension or pain.”

So if you are feeling tight or suffering from muscle tension or pain, adding in yoga could be a great answer for you.

Still not convinced? Check out the National Academy of Sports Medicine’s comments on yoga  – “yoga can be beneficial to injury recovery”.   But, always remember to check with your health care provider before starting any new exercise or stretch routines.

Since we are a local Nashville company, we wanted to share some studios that are in our area.  If you live in Nashville, please check out the list below.

Here are some of our favorite local Nashville yoga studios:

 

We hope these resources help you get your stretch on, Nashville!

 

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Visit http://www.tiyagahealth.com to see how we are helping to improve injury recovery.  

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DISCLAIMER: We strive to create Content that would be of interest and value to individuals recovering from pain and injury.  The founder of this Site is not a licensed medical professional.  Use of the Site or any content on the site, including but not limited to text, software, scripts, code, designs, graphics, photos, sounds, music, videos and all other content (“Content”) is not a substitute for working with a licensed medical professional.   The information on this site is not intended to assess or diagnose health conditions and is not intended to replace the advice of a licensed physician.  All individuals should consult a licensed medical professional prior to starting any exercise or movement program.   The Content of this website is intended for individual education and information purposes only.

Information, exercises, and all other Content provided on the Site are not be taken as medical advice.   The information provided is not intended to diagnose or treat or to be used as an alternative to medical advice.  All individuals are urged to consult a licensed healthcare professional before starting any exercise or movement program, including the exercises that are listed on the Site.

Perseverance Post #2: Sports Injury Recovery and Its Unique Challenges

Continuing with our #perseveranceposts series, started earlier this month with Sarah’s injury recovery story, we thought it was time to share another’s unique injury recovery experience.

We hope that you enjoy reading Peyton’s interview about her experience with sports injury recovery, gain some perspective about injury recovery, and maybe even learn some new ways to motivate yourself and manage your recovery!

Please introduce yourself.

My name is Peyton, and I’m currently a student at the University of Pittsburgh.  I will be a sophomore this upcoming fall and study marketing. I played lacrosse for a majority of my life. I began playing in fifth grade, and continued until my senior year of high school.

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Please share your injury story.

During my freshman year of high school, it was the heart of lacrosse season and I began to have intense pains in both of my calves. I wasn’t sure what the pain was. I tried treatment such as compression socks, KT tape, customized shoes, and new types of stretching, but nothing helped. Eventually I met with my orthopedic surgeon, and he suggested that I get tested for compartment syndrome.

It turns out I had compartment syndrome in both of my legs. One way to relieve myself of the pressure in my legs was to have surgery, a fasciotomy. Late August, I had a bilateral fasciotomy to relieve the pressure in my muscles that was causing me so much pain. After the surgery, I went to physical therapy for three months. I had a lacrosse tournament in November that I wanted to be recovered for. I worked hard and was fully recovered and able to play in the tournament.

Unfortunately, only after two games, I took a bad turn, heard an awful pop, and fell to the ground. I went to the emergency room and was told that I tore my MCL. I left the tournament early, and a week later I got an MRI and met with my orthopedic surgeon yet again. Not only did I tear my MCL, I also tore my ACL. Two weeks later, I had patellar tendon ACL reconstruction surgery on my right knee, and was back at physical therapy.

This injury would take a lot longer than three months. I was expected to be out of lacrosse for at least seven months. I was unable to play that upcoming season, but worked hard and eventually recovered fully. I now am fully recovered from both injuries, and have no pain in either of my legs. I can again enjoy playing sports and do a lot of physical activity with no interference. The only evidence of injury is a couple of scars!

What types of things did you do for recovery?

For the compartment syndrome, surgery was not necessary. During a normal day of activities, I would only have slight pain in my claves, but any athletic activity would cause the pain to get much worse. I decided to have the bilateral fasciotomy so I could continue my lacrosse career and other sports. For the ACL injury, I did not have many options besides getting the surgery. I decided to do the patellar tendon ACL reconstruction over the hamstring ACL reconstruction.

What have you found to be most helpful during your recovery?

Physical therapy definitely helped me the most throughout my recovery process. The physical therapy center I went to, Revolution Physical Therapy, also doubled as a sports strengthening and training center. I enjoyed being in this kind of environment because many patients at this facility also had sports related injuries. Because I was there so often I formed bonds with many of the physical therapists, and felt very comfortable and independent. I got so close to one therapist, that I now babysit his kids!

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What has been the worst part of being injured for you?

I was extremely disappointed to have to sit out of lacrosse season my sophomore year of high school, but my injury even made everyday tasks more difficult. Navigating around high school on crutches in the winter was especially difficult for me.

Are there any unexpected positives that have come out of your injury or injury recovery process?

One positive that actually came from these injuries was that I am now able to provide support and advice to other people with the same injuries. I like to help people with these types of injuries stay positive and let them know recovery may seem like it will be a long process, but if they put in the effort, they will be back on the field in no time.

What is your top tip for people recovering from physical pain or injuries?

Push yourself to the limit, but stay healthy. I wanted to recover in the shortest amount of time possible, so I would sometimes work myself too hard or do my exercises too quickly. I grew impatient and wanted to recover faster. I eventually realized that I needed to work hard, but not rush myself through the process. I was straining myself and was not giving my body time to heal. I realized throughout the recovery process that I needed to recover in a healthy and safe way, and accept that it would take time for my body to heal.

What is your top tip for staying motivated to recover?

When it came to staying motivated, I just looked to the future. At times I got tired of going to physical therapy and wanted to slack off, but I kept going because I had things I wanted to be recovered for in the future. I looked forward to summer activities, traveling, and playing lacrosse again, and wanted to experience those without crutches or a giant brace on my knee.

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What did you do to stay optimistic about your injury recovery?

In order to stay positive, I surrounded myself with people who gave me constant support. Although I couldn’t play on the lacrosse team my sophomore year, I took statistics for the team and traveled with them to every game so I could still be around my teammates.

 

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Visit http://www.tiyagahealth.com to see how we are helping to improve injury recovery.  

…….

DISCLAIMER: We strive to create Content that would be of interest and value to individuals recovering from pain and injury.  The founder of this Site is not a licensed medical professional.  Use of the Site or any content on the site, including but not limited to text, software, scripts, code, designs, graphics, photos, sounds, music, videos and all other content (“Content”) is not a substitute for working with a licensed medical professional.   The information on this site is not intended to assess or diagnose health conditions and is not intended to replace the advice of a licensed physician.  All individuals should consult a licensed medical professional prior to starting any exercise or movement program.   The Content of this website is intended for individual education and information purposes only.

Information, exercises, and all other Content provided on the Site are not be taken as medical advice.   The information provided is not intended to diagnose or treat or to be used as an alternative to medical advice.  All individuals are urged to consult a licensed healthcare professional before starting any exercise or movement program, including the exercises that are listed on the Site.

 

Taking Control of Your Health: 10 Benefits to Starting a Daily Stretching Routine

“Stretching is an excellent thing you can do for your health” – Harvard Medical School

Many of us often have tight muscles and/or suffer from various physical aches and pains, which is normal since over 85% of Americans suffer from some sort of physical ailment during their lifetime. 

But what can we as individuals do about it? There are certainly physicians, surgeons, physical therapists, and other healthcare providers to help – but ultimately the responsibility of our own health and wellbeing falls on us.

So what are some ways that we can take control of our own care?  Sticking to a daily stretching routine is a great place to start!

Consistent stretching has a myriad of benefits from helping you feel better physically, increasing mobility, reducing pain, and preventing injuries.  According to Harvard Health, stretching is important for all ages, but it is especially important as you age since joints can become less flexible over time making it harder to do everyday movements and tasks.

Take a look at the top 10 benefits of starting a daily stretching routine:

1. Improves Posture. Stretching the lower back, hamstrings, chest, and shoulders can help keep the spine in better alignment, making it easier to have good posture. Good posture can also help reduce neck and back pain.

2. Reduces Pain and Soreness. Stretching relaxes your muscles, helping to reduce pain caused from muscle spasms and tightness.  Stretching alongside workouts also helps muscles to relax and restore through increased blood flow and resulting nutrient supply.

3. Decreases Injury Risk. Flexible muscles are less prone to injury.

4. Improves Athletic Performance. Regular stretching helps muscles relax and enables muscles to work most effectively during exercise.

5. Improves Range of Motion. Increased flexibility in your muscles helps improve range of motion in your joints making daily tasks easier and less tiring.

6. Speeds up Recovery. Stretching helps speed up the recovery process after exercise, and it also helps lower your heart rate after a workout, which is critical for an effective cool down.

7. Relieves Stess. Stretching can help jumpstart the mind and body by allowing tight muscles to relax and increasing overall blood flow. Stretching also releases endorphins and can help you sleep better, all proven to be beneficial for relieving stress.

8. Improves Energy Levels. Muscles tighten when you are tired, making you feel lethargic. Some quick stretches can help you re-energize.

9. Improves Coordination and Balance. Improving and maintaining full range of motion can help improve coordination and balance, keeping you more mobile and less prone to injury.

10. Improves Circulation. Stretching increases blood flow which increases nutrient supply and gets rid of waste byproducts. Proper circulation helps your body function properly.

Though occasional stretching is good, it isn’t going to give you the most benefits.

“a daily regimen will deliver the greatest gains… as with all types of exercise, you need to engage in stretching regularly in order to reap lasting benefits.” –  Harvard Health

The key to a great routine, is consistency.

“[not doing] regular stretching means you risk losing the potential benefits. For instance, if stretching helped you increase your range of motion, your range of motion may decrease again if you stop stretching.”  – Mayo clinic

So remember, start stretching today and keep stretching often for a healthier, happier you!

Make sure to consult your physician or physical therapist before starting a new stretching routine.  Always make sure to stretch safely and be sure to use proper technique.  Stretching incorrectly can actually do more harm than good.  If you are looking for a place to start, a physical therapist can show you the best types of stretches given your unique conditions and goals.

 Are you someone who could benefit from a little extra motivation to stick to your daily exercise or stretching routine? Let us help you remember, and help you start feeling better fast! Sign up via facebook messenger here or for our SMS text service here.

 

 

 

Why Consistency is Key for Success in Home Exercise Programs.

Lauren Menino, MS, OTR/L, an Occupational Therapist at NYU Langone Health, joins us today to talk more about why consistency is key for successful home exercise programs.

Why Consistency is Key.

Though dosage and duration will vary for each individual and injury, research into many different therapeutic interventions demonstrates that consistency is a primary factor impacting client outcomes.

Each component of a home exercise program is selected by your therapist to focus on a specific muscle group or movement pattern. Form and alignment are essential for clients to understand to target the appropriate body segments and prevent injury. Research on learning theory confirms that learning via repeated practice leads to improved recall and carryover.

As the saying goes, practice makes perfect.

You, and your body, can more easily repeat something the right way when you have done it over and over. And, when you don’t have to think about the basics of each exercise, you have a chance to focus on specifics such as positioning, stabilizing other muscles, and breathing, to get the most out of your program.

My top five tips for remembering to do your exercises:

1. Figure out what works for you. Does it help to complete your program the morning to alleviate pain throughout the day? Can you make it part of stretch or cool down during a workout? Do you do it during commercials while watching TV? Can it fit as part of your routine when you wake up or before bed?

2. Build it into your schedule. Make your program work for your day so it becomes a habit rather than a burden. Set a goal and keep track of how consistently you follow your program so you can acknowledge progress.

3. Ask your therapist for specifics. Time and frequency, what are the “must do’s” for days when your schedule or your body challenge you.

4. Set a reminder or sign up for a daily reminder service. Visual, auditory or multi-sensory- something to catch your attention. The hardest part is showing up, so have what you need organized that way when you’re ready to start you don’t first have to go running for equipment.

5. Find your motivation. Remind yourself the value of what you are working towards. In the end, your doctor, therapist, etc. are your guides, but you are the primary driver in your recovery.

Lauren Menino, MS, OTR/L, Occupational Therapist at NYU Langone Health

References: 

Bayona, N. A., Bitensky, J., Salter, K. & Teasell, R. (2005). The role of task-specific training in rehabilitation therapies. Topics in stroke rehabilitation, 12 (3).

Brewer, B. W., Cornelius, A. E., Van Raalte, J. L., Tennen, H., & Armeli, S. (2013). Predictors of adherence to home rehabilitation exercises following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Rehabilitation Psychology, 58(1).

Chen, C. Y., Neufeld, P. S., Feely, C. A., & Skinner, C. S. (1999). Factors influencing compliance with home exercise programs among patients with upper-extremity impairment. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 53.

Helfrich, C. (2014). Principles of Learning and Behavioral Change. In Willard & Spackman’s Occupational Therapy. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Palazzo, C., Klinger, E., Dorner, V., Abdelmajid, K., Theirry, O., Boumenir, Y., Martin, W., Poiraudeal, S., & Ville, I. (2016). Barriers to home-based exercise program adherence with chronic low back pain: Patient expectations regarding new technologies. Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 59

Are you someone who has exercises and/or stretches you are supposed to be doing everyday, but always seem to forget? Let us help you remember, and help you start feeling better fast! Sign up via facebook messenger here or for our SMS text service here.

Wishing you a fast recovery!

The Tiyaga Health Team

3 Ways to Feel More Satisfied and Valued at Work When You Are Injured or in Pain

The 4th installment of our Six Dimensions of Wellness series in here! We want to talk about how to maintain occupational wellness.  In other words, how do you stay satisfied with your work and continue to feel valued even when you are injured or in pain and not able to do everything that you used to do.

When we are injured or in pain, we are not at our best.  And when we are not at our best, work often suffers.

And that is not because we don’t want to do our best at work, but sometimes it is just not possible to do the work in the same way when are not feeling physically well.

When the work suffers, sometimes people must move positions or start working part time, leading to dissatisfaction with work and / or not feeling as valued as before.  These aspects of life – feeling satisfied with what you are doing and feeling valued – are an extremely important part of overall wellness, so it is critical to find ways to get those feelings back.

Despite all the work-related challenges that individuals face when injured or in pain, there are still ways to use your skills to contribute to society in a way that makes you feel satisfied and valued.  Here are 3 suggestions we have found that work well:

1. Share Your Skills in a New Way.

Everyone has a skill or an expertise that can be valued by someone else.  Maybe you can share your skills as a part-time consultant, or find work on a site like upwork.com, freelancer.com, or Catalant.  Or you could look into volunteering for an organization or a church group that could benefit from your skills, or even just your companionship and time.

2. Explore a Side Project.

Have you always wanted research a topic, start a business, or become an artist?  Why not explore that side project now? This will allow you to build new functional skills that you can employ elsewhere, or even help you start a new career that you really enjoy.

 3. Share Your Voice.

No matter the injury or the person, everyone has unique experiences and has a unique voice.  Why not share that voice by starting a blog, writing a book, or even joining a community where your voice can be heard.  Check out the Active Injury Recovery Support Group on Facebook.

If you try any of these ideas, let us know! Or do you have any additional ideas as to how to feel satisfied and valued with your work even if you are not working the same way you used to.  Please comment here or on our Facebook page.

Are you someone who has exercises and/or stretches you are supposed to be doing everyday, but always seem to forget? Let us help you remember, and help you start feeling better fast! Sign up via facebook messenger here or for our SMS text service here.

Wishing you a pain-free and fast recovery!

The Tiyaga Health Team